Is Your Implementation Process Going Slower than Expected?

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Is Your Implementation Process Going Slower 
Than Expected?

Enrique Mora

German Version 

One of the main problems when establishing these disciplines, either TPM or any other Lean Manufacturing strategy, is that when all is said and done, the  effort is diluted and eventually gets lost. This is a worse consequence than if the effort had never started.

We have found this a common source of frustration in a big number of companies. What happens is that there is  a mistaken idea that it is sufficient to have a handful of people trained in these disciplines, usually supervisors or managers. Unfortunately, they are still of the old management style where they consider their function is that of a boss

The reality is some of these people feel that with the implementation they will lose power. The truth is that yes, they will lose the power of giving orders, but for those who become true leaders, they acquire the new power that comes from the  respect and admiration of their team members.  

The process is simple, perhaps, that is the reason why key points can be overlooked although they are crucial to the success of the implementation. 

The steps are relatively easy to follow:

1) Only issue invitations and accept those people who show interest and enthusiasm about learning advanced productivity technologies.
Never include people in the projects by force or mandate.

2) Make an appropriate mixture of operators, leaders (supervisors and managers), engineers, staff personnel, etc.

3) Develop an atmosphere of authentic leadership by making them aware that their ideas and voices will be heard; where people cooperate by their own will of being part of the success.

4) Cross-training is a key element in understanding how everyone's job fits into the big picture. This promotes an atmosphere of Cooperation and Motivation.

5) Constantly acknowledge and recognize people's ideas and contributions.

6) Listen to all with attention and try to put into practice their creativity and ingenuity in minor or big improvements to the processes, work areas, machines, facilities, and the product.

7) Close each event making sure that each person learned something, and felt great satisfaction for the achievements. Have the participants express these achievements in the presentation to management.

8) Emphasize that management recognizes these achievements and commits to keep supporting the continuous improvement process.

If any one of these points is not thoroughly completed, it can mean that the effort will have poor results or fail. Therefore, it will be a waste of your invested time and resources.

We are prepared to help you recapture control and to make the Kaizen power yours.  

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This page last updated on

08/01/08 17:30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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